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20130127
20130127
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
" which complained about george w. bush spending $40 million on his second inauguration. jim touched in this. touched on this. they said the inauguration, the ceremonies for aauguration in war time lingering question of tone. that was all about george w. bush's second inaugural. and then for barack obama spending 50 million on his second inauguration, the times wrote fundraising is lagging so far for inaugural plans. and lamenting the fact that in this economy $50 million was tough to raise. just an interesting point. >> next on news watch. hillary clinton serves it up and the press reacts. >> what difference, at this point, does it make? >> hillary clinton finally answers questions about the benghazi debacle. delivering a powerful performance to convince lawmakers and the media to see it her way. did it work? find out next on news watch. y te a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with pri
, george w. bush. another poll shows since president obama was re-elected, just a third of voters think he has been more bipartisan. but the majority, 55% say he's been more confrontational. does this mean nothing can really get done that's meaningful in washington to solve our nation's national debt and help the economy? we have a former white house political director under president george w. bush and a former chief of staff to west virginia senator joe mansion. >> great to be here. >> eric: matt, let me start with you. how do we get here? >> well, you know, i think about the president i served, george w. bush. when he came to office, he really was concerned about trying to if i understand a way to reach across the aisle because clearly bill clinton left the presidency with high numbers. he worked with ted kennedy. he worked with democrats and signature domestic policy issues and then 9/11 happened and the wars occurred. really, the nation polarized again, right versus left. i don't think we have come out of that. obama inherited that. but he talked about bridging that and governing in a
not just idiosyncratic, ideologically-generated products of the george w. bush administration. as we describe in our book, these stem from a much deeper source that cuts across both democratic and republican administrations, and it's something we describe as the united states, essentially, giving in to a post-cold war temptation to act as an imperial power in the middle east. and it is this imperial turn in america's middle east policies pursued with very little regard for realities on the ground in the middle east that have proven not just quixotic, but deeply damaging to american interests. as a candidate back in twaipt, now-president obama then seemed to really understand this. he talked about it courageously during the campaign. he pledged to not just withdraw american troops from iraq, but to change what he called the american mindset that had gotten us into the strategic mistake of invading iraq in the first place. he pledged to really change america's middle east policies. but instead the obama administration has pursued the same sorts of policies as its predecessors, the same
started it in 2007 with harry reid to block george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct. and in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers that this is presidential power. the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. and they are undermining. >> that is really not in dispute. what is in dispute here is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate or the president? >> and i think the oath -- you also have to put this in broader context. >> things got done during that -- >> they weren't in town. they weren't in town. you could not consider a nomination because they weren't here. >> the thing about this, though, put it in broader context. the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing this way, way back and saying in fact if you look at the constitution you can't even if you are a president hold out the recess appointments and then make them finally put them forward when the senate is in recess. the recess has to happ
: the democrats. >> no, democrats -- >> democrats started it in 2007 with harry reid, blocking george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct and, in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers, that this is presidential power, the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. >> chris: juan, i want to -- >> that is not in dispute. what is in dispute here, is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes, who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate? or the president? >> a sham... >> and, in the broader context, there are things -- >> -- things done during that -- >> they weren't in town, they could not consider the nomination because they were not here. >> but it in broader context, the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing it way, way back and saying, in fact if you look at the constitution, you can't even, if you are a president, hold out the recess appointments, and, then make them finally put them forward when senate is in recess. the recess actually has to happen while t
george w. bush? >> sorry. i was tweeting. [laughter] yes and no. politically, republicans distanced themselves from george w. bush because it was the thing to do. numbers do not lie. he became very unpopular. parties do not have to embrace figures and politicians to become unpopular. my view is that a lot of distress over bush's domestic agenda from which they fled in 2005. it had been an ancillary result of failure to defend iraq and have a favorable recognition. >> what might have been a successful policy agenda? >> i think the entire country stopped listening to president bush which would be good for the country when it lost faith that he was managing the war effectively. he found it more difficult to get hearings on some of the issues. a lot of people on the right to it came at bush on a lot of these domestic issues. they were feeling extremely distressed about what was going on in the war and did not want to turn on the war. we have troops in the field. this seems like a noble endeavor. they were angry at him for throwing them on the defensive for the prosecution of the war. as
of democrats think george w. bush's supporters rigged the ohio with voter fraud. 36% think obama supporters did the same thing last november. think back to 9/11. more than a third of the democrats are part of the truther crowd, that president bush knew about the attacks before they happened. as do nearly 60% of african-americans. the difference in the party is the knowledge base. republicans who know more about the news are actually more likely to believe in the conspiracy theories fuelled by the right-wing networks like fox. we have the man who conducted the poll and a syndicated radio host and so michael, you brought this to our attention. i want get you as a generalist like this, what do you think this told you, what surprised you about this poll? >> well, it reinforced what i have suspected all along which is that the business model at the far right is predicated on fear. that they scare the crap out of people, there's never any accountability. for some reason, chris, people don't remember six months later that they were told there was another catastrophe looming and therefore hold those me
to specifically as her accomplishments in that role? >> well, she promoted smart power, meaning after george w. bush and the iraq war sending troops abroad. finding other ways to achieve goals in the war on terror. she's largely been the voice of the women's movement around the world. talking about democracy and women's issues. she's beloved by feminists and holds a feminist role of global stature and i think most significantly in the end she is just very well liked by presidents and prime ministers and our own u.s. military. i mean, talk to the generals and talk to the admirals. they all have great respect for her. she has promoted the internet and facebook, twitter as tools in diplomacy and foreign policy making, probably more than any other person working in our government. >> sounds like a very modern secretary of state but does come at a price in benghazi and that hearing she had where she said, does it really matter what happened on the ground? this will come back to haunt her no matter what she does. >> if she runs for president, though some of the sound bites from the hearings will obv
, sir. >> thank you. >> critics of the court's decision point to the fact that president george w. bush made 141 recess appointments under the same circumstances that the court said were unconstitutional in this case, the court recognizing that republican and democrat presidents have used this said it wasn't persuaded by that, but rather by the text of the constitution itself. now that the pentagon has lifted the ban on women in combat, oppons argue we could have problems with cohesion and combat readiness. it was a hot topic on the sunday morning shows. steve centanni has more. >> reporter: some say women are not strong enough for combat roles. others say they have proven themselves time and time again. it's official, women will be able to serve alongside men, opening up doors to advancement, along the military chain of command. outgoing defense secretary leon panetta signed that order last week. but many insist, this is a basic question of physical ability. >> i think the evidence is clear that combat effectiveness when women have put in those kine of demanding roles, they begin to br
carefully before investing. ♪ lou: well, the "a-team" tonight, former deputy assistant to president george w. bush, former congressional candidate, fox news contributor. thank you both for being here. let me start with you. the republicans have put right spree this back, retain him, i should say at the rnc despite by the general calling for revitalization, new voices, new ideas, get rid of the old and bring in the new and embrace america. how does that work up? >> i think it's going to work out well, and that think he is going to embrace what was said. a lot of people are hopping on. having said that, he has a point. we have to go and speak the truth to the people. diversity is good. diversity of voices, and i believe the republican party which is supposed to be the party has failed at that. lou: to see the big republican bowl, one of the most republican iconic figures saying c'mon, let's take it up. that is radical. and i have to tell you that i see some glimmer of hope there for the republican party as a result. if a guy like barber steps up, that means this is time for things to happen. >
factions that this has to happen this year. >> george w. bush tried to have this conversation. right wing folks within my party said this is not somethingt that we are interested in having. the politics have changed and the temperature has lowered where we have to have a bipartisan conversation. >> losing elections will do that to you. >> especially when you lose the expanded vote something else struck me unusual. he said, quote, the hispanic vote should be ours for a variety of reasons. what are the reasons? >> we should work for every vote. i think what he is trying to say is from a traditional value standpoint and a faith based standpoint, traditional values republican party pretty much lines up with the hispanic culture in terms of gay marriage, in terms of prayer in school and so forth. >> is that how you heard that? >> basically what he was trying to say is as long as we keep hispanics and those folks who care about immigration reform they will be with us on these social issues. here is the reality. the reality is when you look at the bread and butter issues that hispanic families,
a relief it is! >>> welcome back. josh trevino former speechwriter in the george w. bush administration and now at the texas public policy foundation and ambassador swanee hunt who served as u.s. ambassador to austria, now a lecturer at harvard's kennedy school of government. we have just been talking as you saw in a very heated fashion about the situation in north africa and i think that's one core part of the legacy of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an in
by the democrats, they are the george w. bush tax cuts. back to raising the retirement age, that scares the american people. i understand that the republicans are talking, you know, openly and honestly about what needs to happen, but if you are going to do that, you have to have antiage discrimination laws, people in the 70s, sick on the job, could be firedded. i can't imagine working to age 70. talk about it. >> i'm 71 # and still working. liz: god bless you. >> retiredded from the senate and went to work, a different work, but we're not talking a huge increase. people are living longer. people are in better health for a variety of reasons. over a period of years would affect people going forward in the next several years. it would affect probably our children, but even then, it would have a minimal impact, and on social security, for instance, all you're talking about is an honest cost of living increase each year based on actual costs of actual inflation. liz: yeah, i hear that. it's a fantasy that the payroll tax can fund social security. be blunt. the congress already spent it. >>
sat down with the director of management under president bush george w. bush. i wanted to get his reactions. many republicans hoped daniels, a fiscal conservative would run for president in 2012. he turned that job down and made a seriously nerdy move. despite he is not an academic, ened up not president of the united states but president of purdue university. i talked with him. >> budgets are the wrong place to be focused but you have made a career, in part on what you have seen as being critically important, which is the budgeting process. talk to me about the importance of budgets. >> i'm a noncombatant. >> no. i'm interested in the importance of budgets. >> i don't have a party or partisan point of view. i'll say that. i would agree that it's a mistake to fix sate on budgets as though they were the end themselves. they are an expression of what's important to us. we devote the most money to the things we believe is most important. it's a fundmental decision. we have to be thinking in terms of priorities and they translate into the dollars and cents. >> you were wildly popular
assistant to president george w. bush and martin frost is a former texas congressman. thank you both for joining us. >> thank you, thank you. good to be here. >> the current senate makeup. let's take a look at the numbers. 55 democrats, 45 republicans currently. in 2014, 33 seats will be up for re-election. don't go the way of general elections. congressman frost what do you think is going to happen? >> well, first of all, this is a subject i know a fair amount about. i was chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee in 1998, the last time you had the so-called six year itch when the president's party is supposed to lose seats in the sixth year of the president's term. we actually picked up five seats in the house and we broke even in the senate. but what is happening here is that the republican party actually had this same opportunity in 2010 and 2012 and they nominated candidates that were too far to the right and lost some races they shouldn't have lost that happened in missouri and in indiana and in this last election it happened in delaware and colorado and nevad
presidents have had to do the hard work. esident george h.w. bush made a budget agreent for which he -- may have caused him to lose the election in 1992 because it angered a number of republicans, but it also helped balance the budget and gave us a period of time in the 1990's when that agreement plus a good economy gave us an actual surplus of funding. sense that there is at the white house a feeling, two things that i would like to disabuse the white house of. thfirst is tt the budget problem isn't a real problem. i can't believe that people at the white house think that. i mean, everybody knows it is. senator mcconnell gave a very good explanation of what was going -- what was going on there, but let me say it this way -- in 2025, according to the congressional budget office, every dollar of taxes we collect will go to pay for medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt, and there is nothing left for national defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it al
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)